Canadian Horse Expo Set for October 13, 2018

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“This breed can compete at the highest levels against any other breed,” says driving champion and N. American judge Francois Bergeron. Pictured here is Albert Gravel and his stallions Quarte G Beauty Wild H-Aragorn and Quatre G Beauty Wild Valentine. Photo credit: Elizabeth Ann Tuppert.

Canadian Horse Expo Set for October 13, 2018 Showcases Rare Breed and Why They Are Your Next Perfect Horse!

 

HARWINTON, CT – The Canadian Horse Expo will be held October 13, 2018 (rain date 10/14) from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Harwinton Fairground, 80 Locust Road, Harwinton, CT 06791. The day will consist of under saddle/harness demonstrations, equine-related seminars, presentations about the breed and a Breeder’s Barn featuring farms, horses for sale and stallions standing at stud from Canada and the US. There will also be vendors and food onsite. Entry is $5 for those 14 and over. For children under 14, there is a voluntary donation. For more information or to check on event updates, see our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/canadianhorseexpo

There are several Canadians competing at upper level dressage. Here Alison Otter and her Canadian Bellechasse Harrison Nathan aka Leonidas van Pelt or “Lionus,” are currently competing at FEI level I1. Photo by Karen Taylor.

Some of the featured presenters include Heidi Potter, clinician/author/trainer who regularly speaks at Equine Affaire, Sharon Wilsie, trainer/author of Horsespeak, reproductive specialist Dr. Ronald Emond, Samantha Walker, Masterson Method practitioner and instructor and many others including topics such as nutrition, saddle fitting, taking quality photos of your horse, Equissage, and sport psychology. Demonstrations range from mounted archery to classical and western dressage, jumping, combined driving, obstacles, and foresting and agriculture. A wide variety of vendors will also offer a full range of horse-related items and attendees will have chances to win raffles and auction items as well.

Formerly a fourth level dressage horse, Saguenay Eve Yukon Jospatriote now competes in mounted archery with his owner and mounted archery trainer, Kimberley Beldam. Photo credit: Greg Baldam.

The little known Canadian Horse is the oldest distinct breed in North America and is listed as critically endangered by both the Livestock Conservancy and the Equus Survival Trust. This horse was bred for versatility, athleticism, stamina and soundness. And they are beautiful!

Stallion Three Fold H-Aragorn Anarchy, a typical example of the breed. Breed standards are 14.2hh to 16hh with a strong short and broad back, broad and muscled chest, long sloping well-muscled shoulder, a firm and well-muscled hind end, clean lean thick and wide hocks, thick strong and hard feet, thick and flowing mane and tail, a square shorter head with straight lines smaller alert ears. Photo credit: Laurie Néron.

Often referred to as “the affordable Warmblood” (Canadians are warmblood eligible) or “the reasonably priced Friesian,” this breed has the looks and the power to perform at the highest levels of competition while still being “in your pocket” enough to be the family horse. Today, they are used for everything from dressage, eventing, working equitation and foxhunting to competitive trail riding, barrels/roping, driving — even Civil War re-enactment and ski joering!

The Canadian helped the Union Army win the Civil War and were highly desired as both artillery and riding horses. Here, re-enactor Ken Morris rides his Canadian mare Témis Uvani Héritage and says they still possesses the attributes described in a 1859 horseman’s manual he found in an antique store. Photo by Bryan S. Peterson

The breed also has a colorful history, beginning at the stables of King Louis XIV through the founding of Canada to helping win the American Civil War. They have almost gone extinct twice in their 350+ year history and today the population hovers around 6500. The eighteenth century Canadian historian Etienne Faillon described the breed as “robust, hocks of steel, thick mane flowing in the wind, bright and lively eyes, pricking sensitive ears… going along day or night with the same courage, wide awake beneath its harness, spirited, good, gentle, affectionate, following his road with the finest instinct to come surely to his own stable.”

 

Today, the Livestock Conservancy (the US association for endangered livestock breeds) describes them as “solid and well-muscled, with a well-arched neck set high on a long, sloping shoulder. The overall impression is one of a round, sturdy and well-balanced horse [that is] energetic without being nervous.”

“This breed can compete at the highest levels against any other breed,” says driving champion and N. American judge Francois Bergeron. Pictured here is Albert Gravel and his stallions Quarte G Beauty Wild H-Aragorn and Quatre G Beauty Wild Valentine. Photo credit: Elizabeth Ann Tuppert.

For more information on the history and breed standards, see https://tinyurl.com/Livestock-Conservancy or The Canadian Horse Breeders Association: www.lechevalcanadien.ca

 

There’s still time if you’d like to be a vendor, sponsor, participant or volunteer at the show. Contact: